Tag: Behavioral Economics

  • Make Hay While the Sun Shines

    Make Hay While the Sun Shines

    Originating in agriculture, the proverb “Make hay while the sun shines” metaphorically advocates for seizing opportune moments. It highlights the essence of timing and adaptability in life’s diverse contexts, from professional to personal realms.

  • Availability Cascade

    Availability Cascade

    In an Availability Cascade, beliefs become widely accepted through frequent public repetition. This phenomenon, crucial in shaping public discourse, is driven by psychological factors and media influence, extending its reach beyond cultural limits.

  • Nudging

    Nudging

    Nudge theory, developed by Thaler and Sunstein, utilizes subtle cues to influence decision-making, applied in fields like public policy and health. It operates on the principle that small environmental or informational adjustments can significantly impact behavior, prioritizing ethical application and individual autonomy.

  • Opportunism

    Opportunism

    Opportunism, fundamentally characterized by the pursuit of immediate benefits, manifests in politics, business, and personal relations, emphasizing short-term gains over long-term stability and ethics. Its evolution, rooted in adaptability and moral flexibility, offers a complex perspective on decision-making across various contexts.

  • Antifragility

    Antifragility

    Nassim Nicholas Taleb’s antifragility describes systems that gain from stress, differentiating from mere resilience. This principle, applicable from biological to economic systems, underscores growth and adaptation amidst volatility and unpredictability.

  • Time Horizon

    Time Horizon

    Time Horizon, a concept spanning various fields, refers to the duration over which decisions and investments remain relevant. It plays a crucial role in strategic planning, influencing risk management and long-term goal setting across different cultural and societal contexts.

  • Goodhart’s Law

    Goodhart’s Law

    Coined by Charles Goodhart, the principle “When a measure becomes a target, it ceases to be a good measure” highlights the unintended repercussions of emphasizing a singular metric. Originating from monetary policy observations, the principle reveals how entities adjust their behaviors in response to metrics becoming primary objectives across diverse sectors.

  • Overreach

    Overreach

    Overreach signifies actions pushed past prudent limits, often culminating in adverse effects across political, economic, and strategic realms, necessitating recalibration to mitigate risks and restore balance.

  • Trade-off Denialism

    Trade-off Denialism

    Trade-off denialism (or Opportunity Cost Neglect) is the disregard for the necessary balance between competing outcomes in decision-making, which can result in policies and strategies that fail to account for critical constraints and limitations.