Tag: Groupthink

  • Availability Cascade

    Availability Cascade

    In an Availability Cascade, beliefs become widely accepted through frequent public repetition. This phenomenon, crucial in shaping public discourse, is driven by psychological factors and media influence, extending its reach beyond cultural limits.

  • The Great Enshittening

    The Great Enshittening

    The Great Enshittening delineates a decline in tech companies’ service quality, marked by a shift from user-focused benefits to prioritizing shareholder gains, impacting user trust and market dynamics, and emerging as a notable trend in technology sector analysis.

  • Tall Poppy Syndrome

    Tall Poppy Syndrome

    Tall Poppy Syndrome, rooted in historical anecdotes, manifests as societal pushback against conspicuous success. It reflects deep-rooted tensions between individual accomplishment and collective conformity, gaining prominence in settings that emphasize social equality.

  • Groupthink

    Groupthink

    Groupthink is a psychological dynamic in groups where the desire for harmony leads to poor decision-making, characterized by suppressed dissent and inadequate evaluation of alternatives and risks.

  • Movement, Business, Racket

    Movement, Business, Racket

    Eric Hoffer posits that movements, rooted in shared convictions, transition from impassioned origins to organized frameworks, and might ultimately deviate to self-serving rackets. This trajectory, prevalent across time, reveals the nuanced dynamics and potential pitfalls of collective actions.

  • Institutional Entropy

    Institutional Entropy

    Institutional entropy describes the gradual decline in organizational efficiency and purpose over time. Influenced by both internal structures and external forces, the concept highlights the inevitable challenges that institutions face in maintaining order and achieving objectives.

  • Normies

    Normies

    The term “normies” emerges from internet communities, signifying individuals conforming to mainstream cultural preferences. It highlights a distinction between enthusiasts of niche internet subcultures and the general populace. As global cultures merge, such categorizations could undergo transformation.

  • WYSIATI – What You See Is All There Is

    WYSIATI – What You See Is All There Is

    The principle of WYSIATI highlights humanity’s propensity to draw conclusions from visible data while neglecting what might be omitted. Originally identified by Daniel Kahneman, this cognitive bias has significant ramifications across various fields, from politics to finance.