Tag: Philosophy of Science

  • Limits of Language (Wittgenstein)

    Limits of Language (Wittgenstein)

    Ludwig Wittgenstein, a significant 20th-century philosopher, explored language’s role in shaping perceived reality. His works, from “Tractatus” to “Philosophical Investigations,” marked a paradigm shift, viewing language as dynamic and contextually driven, profoundly influencing philosophy, logic, and psychology.

  • Antifragility

    Antifragility

    Nassim Nicholas Taleb’s antifragility describes systems that gain from stress, differentiating from mere resilience. This principle, applicable from biological to economic systems, underscores growth and adaptation amidst volatility and unpredictability.

  • Demystification

    Demystification

    Demystification, rooted in Enlightenment values, involves clarifying obscure subjects through rational explanations. Applied across various fields, it emphasizes analytical approaches and factual evidence to enhance understanding and challenge established beliefs.

  • Techne vs. Episteme

    Techne vs. Episteme

    Stemming from Greek thought, Techne refers to hands-on skills and craftsmanship, while Episteme denotes theoretical understanding and universal truths, distinguishing two foundational types of knowledge.

  • The Uninitiated

    The Uninitiated

    The term “Uninitiated” historically referred to individuals not introduced to religious rituals or ceremonies. In contemporary contexts, its meaning has broadened to denote those unfamiliar with specific subjects or practices in various fields, distinguishing them from the “initiated” who possess domain-specific knowledge.

  • Paradoxical and, to the Uninitiated, Absurd

    Paradoxical and, to the Uninitiated, Absurd

    Diverging from classical Euclidean concepts, non-Euclidean geometry, birthed in the 19th century, explores alternative geometric systems. Its theoretical breakthroughs have been instrumental in reshaping fields from advanced physics to cosmology, enriching the comprehension of spatial constructs.

  • As-If

    As-If

    Originating from the works of philosopher Hans Vaihinger, the “As-If” approach facilitates the analysis of complex systems using hypothetical scenarios. This methodology, while not always reflecting true conditions, aids in rendering intricate concepts more comprehensible.

  • Adding Epicycles

    Adding Epicycles

    In scientific modeling, adding epicycles refers to augmenting a model’s structure to accommodate unexplained data. This practice, which has its roots in ancient geocentric theories of astronomy, often compromises both the model’s simplicity and its predictive accuracy.

  • Causal Inference

    Causal Inference

    Causal inference provides a framework for deducing the relationship between cause and effect using empirical data. It employs a variety of rigorous methods to ensure the validity of its findings, making it indispensable in fields such as policy evaluation, economics, and healthcare.