Tag: Feedback Loops

  • POSIWID – The Purpose Of a System Is What It Does

    POSIWID – The Purpose Of a System Is What It Does

    POSIWID, or “The Purpose Of a System Is What It Does,” posits that a system’s real purpose is evident through its outcomes, not its intended goals. This principle, applicable in various domains, emphasizes examining actual results to gain insights into system functionality and inform improvement strategies.

  • Scratch Your Own Itch

    Scratch Your Own Itch

    “Scratch your own itch” embodies the idea that personal frustrations can inspire solutions with wider appeal. It suggests that solving one’s own problems can lead to innovations that others value, emphasizing the role of personal insight in identifying and addressing unmet needs.

  • Goodhart’s Law

    Goodhart’s Law

    Coined by Charles Goodhart, the principle “When a measure becomes a target, it ceases to be a good measure” highlights the unintended repercussions of emphasizing a singular metric. Originating from monetary policy observations, the principle reveals how entities adjust their behaviors in response to metrics becoming primary objectives across diverse sectors.

  • MVP (Minimum Viable Product)

    MVP (Minimum Viable Product)

    Originating from the Lean Startup methodology, the Minimum Viable Product (MVP) is a product version with only essential features, developed to validate a specific business hypothesis quickly. This approach prioritizes user feedback, enabling prompt refinements to ensure the product meets market demands while optimizing resource use.

  • Participant-Instigation

    Participant-Instigation

    The concept of “Participant-Instigation” highlights the central role participants play in initiating actions or changes. Rooted in historical events, its modern manifestations are shaped by digital platforms across diverse cultural settings. The concept is measurable and carries ethical implications.

  • Imposter Syndrome

    Imposter Syndrome

    Imposter Syndrome, identified in 1978 by psychologists Clance and Imes, denotes a psychological condition where individuals doubt their genuine achievements, fearing exposure as “frauds.” Despite clear evidence of competence, individuals attribute success to luck and often discount their accomplishments, leading to professional hesitancy and psychological stress.

  • Gall’s Law

    Gall’s Law

    Gall’s Law posits that effective complex systems evolve from simpler, functional predecessors. Widely applied in fields like engineering and organizational design, the principle advocates for an iterative development process that starts with basic, operational systems.

  • Conflict Avalanche

    Conflict Avalanche

    A “Conflict Avalanche” signifies the rapid escalation of a minor disagreement into a significant dispute, influenced by underlying tensions and external factors. The progression is often intensified by societal tools, psychological factors, and historical grievances, leading to complex resolutions with profound implications.